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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2344/334

タイトル: Is Learning by Migrating to a Megalopolis Really Important? Evidence from Thailand
著者: Machikita, Tomohiro
町北, 朋洋
キーワード: Self-selection
Learning by migrating
Survival of the fittest
Exits
Thailand
Population movement
Labor market
自己選抜効果
移住学習効果
自然淘汰
退出
タイ
人口移動
労働市場
Issue Date: Dec-2006
出版者: Institute of Developing Economies, JETRO
引用: IDE Discussion Paper. No. 82. 2006.12
抄録: We examine the effects of learning by migrating on the productivity of migrants who move to a "megalopolis" from rural areas using the Thailand Labor Force Survey. The main contribution is to the development a simple framework to test for self-selection on migration decisions and learning by migrating into the urban labor market, focusing on experimental evidence in the observational data. The role of the urban labor market is examined. In conclusion, we find significant evidence for sorting: the self-selection effects test (1) is positive among new entrants from rural areas to the urban labor market; and (2) is negative among new exits that move to rural areas from the urban labor market. Further, estimated effects of learning by migrating into a "megalopolis" have a less significant impact. These results suggest the existence of a natural selection (i.e. survival of the fittest) mechanism in the urban labor market in a developing economy.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2344/334
Appears in Collections:04.IDE Discussion Paper
01.経済、産業(Economy and Industry)/東南アジア(Southeast Asian Studies)

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